DEY KRAHORM, CAMBODIA (2007-2008)

DEY KRAHORM, CAMBODIA (2007-2008)

DEY KRAHORM, CAMBODIA (2007-2008)

DEY KRAHORM, CAMBODIA (2007-2008)
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The Cambodian land grab for prime real estate is not only going to the highest bidders but also the companies that can assemble the best lawyers, contractors and “negotiators”. The long-running story of Dey Krahorm is but one illustration of the social and class struggle caught in the throes of a city’s growing pains.

The community of Dey Krahorm, or Red Soil Village, began living in Tonle Bassac of Chom Kamon district of Phnom Penh back in the early 1980s after they cleared the uninhabitable swamp land and filled it with Cambodia’s infamous red soil. It is a community composed of street vendors, musicians, artists, taxi-girls, laborers and families.

Troubles began for the community when developers saw the potential of the site and its proximity to the city. Their interest worried residents who felt confused, intimidated and, worse still, abandoned by their government.